In Connecticut, a quitclaim deed is employed for transferring real estate property when the grantor (the seller) relinquishes their possible ownership rights to the grantee (the buyer), with no assurances about potential co-owners of the property.

Essentially, the grantor is only conveying their potential ownership claim to the property, if such a claim exists. This kind of deed is typically used in property transfers among family members.

Here is a step by step guide to assist you in filling out the Connecticut quit claim deed form. 

Step 1

Fill in the full legal name of the individual preparing the quitclaim deed. This ensures accountability and provides a point of contact for any clarifications or questions about the deed.

If your name is Thomas Jefferson, then write “Thomas Jefferson.”

Step 2

Fill in the full address, including street, city, and state, of the individual preparing the deed. This enables accurate identification and traceability of the individual responsible for creating the deed.

If your address is 555 Elm Street, Hartford, CT, then write “555 Elm Street, Hartford, CT.”

Step 3

Fill in the state and zip code of the individual preparing the deed. This aids in further identifying the location of the individual preparing the deed.

If your state is Connecticut and your zip code is 06103, then write “Connecticut, 06103.”

Step 4

Fill in the full legal name of the individual to whom the deed should be returned after recording. This is typically the new owner (grantee). This ensures that it will reach the intended recipient after being recorded, usually the new owner.

If the new owner is Susan Adams, then write “Susan Adams.”

Step 5

Fill in the full address of the individual to whom the deed should be returned. Providing the returnee’s full address ensures that the recorded deed will reach the right destination, preventing potential legal complications.

If Susan Adams’s address is 777 Maple Street, Hartford, CT, then write “777 Maple Street, Hartford, CT.”

Step 6

Fill in the state and zip code of the individual to whom the deed should be returned.  Providing the state and zip code of the returnee helps in accurate delivery of the recorded deed.

If Susan Adams’s state is Connecticut and her zip code is 06105, then write “Connecticut, 06105.”

Step 7

Fill in the county where the property is located. Specifying the county where the property is located helps identify the correct local jurisdiction for property records and tax purposes.

If the county where the property is located is Hartford County, then write “Hartford County.”

Step 8

Fill in the total monetary amount that the grantee is paying to the grantor for the property. Include both words and numbers for clarity. Entering the total monetary value of the transaction provides legal evidence of the consideration exchanged for the property, an essential aspect of a valid deed.

If the total monetary amount paid for the property is one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, then write “One hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($150,000).”

Step 9

Fill in the full legal name of the individual or entity selling or transferring the property (grantor), their legal status (for example, single, married, a corporation), and their full address. Providing the grantor’s information helps establish the legal identity of the person or entity selling or transferring the property.

If you are Thomas Jefferson, an individual residing at 555 Elm Street, Hartford, CT, then write “Thomas Jefferson, an individual, 555 Elm Street, Hartford, CT.”

Step 10

Fill in the full legal name of the individual or entity receiving the property (grantee), their legal status, and their full address. Filling in the grantee’s information confirms the identity of the person or entity receiving the property, establishing the new rightful owner.

If the new owner is Susan Adams, an individual residing at 777 Maple Street, Hartford, CT, then write “Susan Adams, an individual, 777 Maple Street, Hartford, CT.”

Step 11

Fill in the full legal description of the property. This usually includes lot numbers, block numbers, or survey coordinates and should match the legal description on the current deed. You may need to attach a separate page if there’s not enough room.

Writing down a detailed legal description of the property ensures that the exact piece of property being transferred is clearly identified, which is crucial to avoid future disputes or issues.

If the full legal description of the property is “Lot 5 in Block 9 of the Hartford Estates, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 17, Page 36 of the Hartford County land records,” then write this exact legal description.

Step 12

The grantor(s) should sign, print their names, and provide their addresses.

If you are Thomas Jefferson residing at 555 Elm Street, Hartford, CT, then sign and print “Thomas Jefferson, 555 Elm Street, Hartford, CT.”

Step 13

Two witnesses should sign, print their names, and provide their addresses. If the notary public agrees, they may also act as one of the witnesses.

Getting the deed signed and printed by the grantor, witnesses, and notary public validates the deed and makes it legally binding, ensuring the voluntary transfer of property rights from the grantor to the grantee.

If the first witness is Peter Smith residing at 888 Oak Street, Hartford, CT, then Peter Smith should sign and print “Peter Smith, 888 Oak Street, Hartford, CT.”

If the second witness is Jane Johnson residing at 999 Walnut Street, Hartford, CT, then Jane Johnson should sign and print “Jane Johnson, 999 Walnut Street, Hartford, CT.” (If a notary public acts as a witness, they would sign here as well).

Notarization 

The notary public completes this section, acknowledging that the grantor(s) voluntarily executed the document. The notary will sign, date, and stamp this section.

Conclusion

By accurately identifying the parties, describing the property, obtaining required signatures and notarization, this process leads you through correctly completing a Connecticut quitclaim deed for a smooth property transfer.