In Florida, a quit claim deed serves to transfer property ownership without any guarantees or warranties. This implies that the seller or ‘Grantor’ is not affirming their ownership of the property. Rather, they are simply transferring any rights they may have in the property (if they indeed have any). It is strongly advised to carry out a title search before the final transaction to confirm that the title is clear.

Here is a step by step guide to help you fill out the Florida quit claim deed form.

Step 1: Prepared By Name

This indicates the person or entity that prepared and provided the quit claim deed document. It is best practice to include the preparer’s full legal name.

This signifies the person or organization responsible for creating the document, so that if there are any errors or omissions, they can be contacted for corrections.

If your name is “Robert Johnson”, then provide “Robert Johnson”.

Step 2: Address

The preparer’s full mailing address should be listed here. This includes street address, city, state, and zip code.

This is necessary for any communication related to the deed.

If your address is “789 Maple Street, Jacksonville, Florida, 32202”, then provide “789 Maple Street, Jacksonville, Florida, 32202”.

Step 3: After Recording Return To Name

After the deed is recorded by the County Recorder’s office, the original recorded deed will be returned to the person listed here. Include their full legal name. 

This is usually the new owner or their representative.

If the person you want the recorded deed sent to is named “Linda Williams”, then provide “Linda Williams”.

Step 4: Address

Mailing address to return the recorded deed to. Include street address, city, state, and zip code. Having a correct address ensures the document reaches the right person.

If Linda’s address is “2468 Pine Drive, Tampa, Florida, 33602”, then provide “2468 Pine Drive, Tampa, Florida, 33602”.

Step 5: TAX PARCEL ID #

The property’s tax identification number as assigned by the County Tax Assessor’s office. This links the property to the deed. This unique identifier allows the tax assessor’s office to link the property to the deed. It’s crucial for property tax purposes.

If your property’s tax parcel ID is “23-45-67-8901-023-4567”, then provide “23-45-67-8901-023-4567”.

Step 6: Space Above This Line for Recorder’s Use

This space is left blank for the County Recorder to stamp the document with recording information once filed. The county recorder needs a space to stamp and record the document’s filing details.

Step 7: County

Enter the county where the property is located. This indicates the jurisdiction where the property is located, and where the deed needs to be recorded.

If your property is in “Hillsborough” county, then provide “Hillsborough”.

Step 8: Date 

Enter the date the deed was signed by the Grantor. The date is crucial because it marks when the grantor officially transferred their rights to the property.

If the date you are signing the document is “20th July 2023”, then provide “20th July 2023”.

Step 9: Grantor

The person or entity who currently holds ownership and is transferring their rights via the deed. Include their full legal name, entity type, and mailing address. Identifying the grantor legally establishes who is relinquishing the property’s ownership.

If your name is “Robert Johnson” and your address is “789 Maple Street, Jacksonville, Florida, 32202”, then provide “Robert Johnson, an individual, 789 Maple Street, Jacksonville, Florida, 32202”.

Step 10: Grantee

The person or entity who is receiving ownership via the deed. Include their full legal name, entity type, and mailing address. Identifying the grantee establishes who is receiving the property. The address is important for future tax bills and notifications.

If the person receiving the property is “Linda Williams” and her address is “2468 Pine Drive, Tampa, Florida, 33602”, then provide “Linda Williams, an individual, 2468 Pine Drive, Tampa, Florida, 33602”.

Step 11: Consideration amount

Provide the dollar amount exchanged for the property rights transfer. Typically the property’s sale price or a nominal amount if transferring between related parties.

This establishes the value that was exchanged for the property, important for both legal and tax purposes.

If the amount exchanged for the property rights transfer is “$150,000”, then provide “$150,000”.

 

Step 12: Legal Description

Enter the full legal description of the property boundaries, attached as Exhibit A if lengthy. This precisely identifies the property.

This provides a unique description of the property being transferred. Without this, it would be difficult to conclusively identify the property.

If the full legal description of your property is “Lot 3, Block 2, Pine Haven, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 21 and 22, of the Public Records of Hillsborough County, Florida”, then provide that description.

Step 13: Grantor’s Signature

The signature of the current property owner to execute the transfer is provided here. Typically signed in the presence of a notary public. The grantor’s signature shows their intent to transfer the property.

Sign here as “Robert Johnson”.

Step 14: Grantor’s Name

This includes the printed name of the Grantor, often located below the signature line.  This information allows future contact if necessary. 

Print your name as “Robert Johnson”.

Step 15: Address

Grantor’s mailing address is included below their name.  This verifies the identity of the grantor.

Provide your address as “789 Maple Street, Jacksonville, Florida, 32202”.

Step 16: Witness Signature

Witnesses are required to witness the Grantor’s signature. Having a witness helps to confirm that the deed was signed willingly and knowingly.

Two individuals who are not parties to the transaction will sign here.

Step 17: Notarization 

The notary signs and seals this verification that the Grantor appeared before them and proved their identity on the date listed.  

Conclusion

By identifying the preparer and parties, detailing the property description, obtaining grantor and witness signatures, and securing notarization, this process guides you through accurately completing a Florida quitclaim deed to smoothly convey property ownership.