A quitclaim deed for Kentucky is a document utilized to transfer property within the state. Unlike other deeds, it does not offer any guarantee of a clear title. This means that the transferor does not assure the transferee that there are no other claims or interests in the property.

This form is typically employed in transactions involving close relationships, like among family members, or between an individual and their trust.

If you have any doubts about your rights to the property you’re acquiring, it is advised that either you or a title company conduct a thorough title search tracing property transfers back at least half a century.

Here is a step by step guide to help you in filling out the Kentucky quit claim deed form.

Step 1

Enter the name of the person or company who prepared the document. This enables any future clarification or resolution of discrepancies related to the document.

If the document is being prepared by “David Murphy,” he would write his name here.

Step 2

Provide the complete address, including street name, city, state, and zip code of the person or company who prepared the document. This ensures correspondence or related documents are correctly sent to the preparer.

David would provide his full address, for instance, “1234 Maple Drive, Louisville, Kentucky, 40222”.

Step 3

Write down the name of the person or company to whom the document should be returned after recording. This aids in directing the document back to the intended recipient after the official recording is complete.

The person to whom the document should be returned might be “Sarah Thompson.” Sarah’s name would be written here.

Step 4

Include the complete address, including street name, city, state, and zip code where the document should be returned. This facilitates a smooth return of the document to its correct destination.

Sarah’s complete address would be included here, for example, “5678 Elm Street, Lexington, Kentucky, 40507”.

Step 5

Write the county where the property is located. County-specific details help in maintaining accurate public records of property transactions.

If the property is located in “Fayette County,” this would be written here.

Step 6

Fill in the agreed sum of money that the grantee is paying to the grantor. Transparency of the monetary exchange allows for clear records of the property’s transfer value.

The amount paid for the property should be written here. If it was $100,000, then that amount would be noted.

Step 7

Enter the grantor’s full name, their legal status (individual, trust, company), and their complete address including city, county, and state. These details establish the identity of the party relinquishing the property rights.

In this step, David would enter his full name, legal status as an “individual,” and his complete address, “1234 Maple Drive, Louisville, Kentucky, 40222”.

Step 8

State the grantee’s full name, their legal status (individual, trust, company), and their complete address including city, county, and state. These details help to affirm the identity of the party receiving the property rights.

Sarah’s full name, legal status as an “individual,” and her complete address, “5678 Elm Street, Lexington, Kentucky, 40507” would be provided here.

Step 9

Include once again the county where the property is located. This double-checking aids in consistent recording of the property’s location in official documents.

“Fayette County” would be written down again as this is the county where the property is located.

Step 10

Here, you should provide a detailed legal description of the property. This aids in precise identification of the property being transferred, ensuring that there are no discrepancies or confusion about which property is involved in the transaction.

An example might be “Lot 12 of the Spring Meadow Subdivision, as shown on Plat Book 4, Page 75, in the Fayette County Recorder’s Office”.

Step 11

This step asks for the date when the grantor originally acquired the property. This provides a history of the property’s ownership, which can be crucial in resolving potential disputes or issues in the future.

This could be a specific date, for example, “July 15, 2015”.

Step 12

The deed should be signed and dated by the grantor. This step solidifies the grantor’s intent to transfer ownership, serving as evidence that the transaction was conducted willingly and in good faith.

Finally, David would sign and date the deed. It might look something like “David Murphy, July 20, 2023”.

Notarization 

The notary public will complete this section. It includes the name(s) of the person(s) signing the document, the date it was acknowledged before the notary, and the notary’s signature and commission expiry date.

The notary public, as a disinterested third party, bears witness to the voluntary execution of the deed by the grantor(s), thereby certifying that the parties signed the document of their own free will and were not subject to coercion or duress.

Conclusion

By carefully inputting the required information and securing the necessary signatures, a quitclaim deed can successfully convey real estate in Kentucky between a grantor and grantee. Adhering to the steps outlined in this guide will result in a valid legal document.