A Tennessee quit claim deed is a legal document used to transfer property ownership from the grantor (current owner) to the grantee (new owner). This document needs to be duly filled out, signed, and notarized, then filed with the Tennessee Register of Deeds to effect the transfer.

Unlike a Warranty Deed, a quit claim deed does not guarantee that the grantor owns the property in question or that the title is clear, making it more suitable for informal property transfers such as those between family members or close relations.

The grantee bears the responsibility of verifying the extent of the property rights being transferred, as well as ensuring that the consideration paid is commensurate with those rights.

Here is the detailed breakdown of each section of the quitclaim deed and what you need to provide:

Step 1

The full name of the person who is preparing this document should be entered here. This could be an attorney, a real estate agent, or one of the parties involved in the transaction.

Step 2

The full address, state, and zip code of the person preparing the document should ne included here.

Step 3

Owner/Responsible Taxpayer Name: The full name of the person to whom the document will be returned after recording should be included here. This is typically the new owner of the property (the grantee).

Step 4

The full address, state, and zip code of the person to whom the document will be returned after recording should be included here.

Step 5 

The unique number that identifies the property for tax purposes should be included here. You can typically find this on a tax bill or by contacting the county tax assessor’s office.

Step 6 

Here, you specify the amount of money (consideration) given to the grantor by the grantee in exchange for the property.

Step 7

The full name  and address of the person or entity that is transferring ownership of the property should be entered here.

Step 8

The full name and address of the person or entity that is receiving ownership of the property should be entered here.

Step 9

Here, provide a detailed legal description of the property as it appears in county records. This could include the property’s boundaries, lot number, block number, or other identifying details.

Step 10

Each Grantor signs and prints their name, and provides their full address including city, state, and zip code.

Step 11

Each Witness signs and prints their name, and provides their full address including city, state, and zip code.

State 12 

This section will be completed by the notary public to authenticate the signatures. The notary will write in the date, sign the document, and affix their seal.

Step 13

This is where the person(s) transferring the property (the affiant) verifies under oath the actual consideration for the transfer. They will write the consideration amount and sign.

This oath will be subscribed and sworn to in the presence of a notary public, who will then complete their section by dating, signing, and stamping the document.

It’s important to complete each of these fields accurately because a quit claim deed is a legal document. Errors or omissions can lead to disputes or complications in the future.

Once a quitclaim deed is completed and signed, it needs to be filed, or “recorded,” with the appropriate county office, typically known as the County Recorder’s Office or Register of Deeds, to be enforceable.

Conclusion

As you embark on your journey to property ownership or transfer in the Volunteer State, the Tennessee quit claim deed remains a powerful tool in your arsenal. By meticulously following the steps outlined in this guide, you’ll not only safeguard your interests but also ensure a smooth transition of property ownership.

Remember, the devil is in the details, and in the world of legal documents, precision is key. So, proceed with confidence, and let your understanding of the Tennessee quit claim deed lead you towards property transaction success.