A Michigan special warranty deed is a document utilized for the conveyance of property with a limited assurance within the state of Michigan.

This differs from a standard warranty deed which provides a guarantee for the title extending back to before the grantor’s ownership of the property, whereas a covenant deed only vouches for the title during the time the grantor possessed the property.

Essentially, the grantor attests that they have not transferred any ownership interests in the property to anyone else during their tenure of ownership.

Nevertheless, the grantor does not make any guarantees concerning the property before they became the owner.

Therefore, it’s advised to conduct a title search to avoid unexpected issues related to property ownership.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to fill in each blank field in the provided special warranty deed form:

Step 1

Enter the name of the person preparing this document.

The name of the person preparing the document is necessary to establish accountability for the document’s content.

For instance, if there are any questions or issues concerning the document, this person would be the first point of contact.

Example: “John Doe”.

Step 2

Input the address of the person preparing this document.

Providing the address of the person preparing the document creates a physical point of contact and provides additional details for tracking and verification purposes.

For instance, if the preparer lives at “123 Cherry Lane, Lansing, Michigan, 48933”.

Step 3

Enter the name of the person to whom the document should be returned after recording.

The name of the person to whom the document should be returned after recording is required to ensure the document gets back to the correct person, often the Grantor or their legal representative.

For instance, this could be the name of the Grantor’s attorney, “Jane Smith”.

Step 4

Write the address of the person to whom the document should be returned.

Providing the address of the person to whom the document should be returned is important to make sure it reaches the right destination after being recorded.

For instance, the return address could be “456 Oak Street, Detroit, Michigan, 48201”.

Step 5

Enter the full name of the person selling or transferring the property. 

The full name of the person selling or transferring the property is crucial as it legally identifies the current owner of the property.

Example: “John Doe”.

Step 6

Input the full address, including the county and state, of the Grantor.

Providing the full address of the Grantor confirms their residence and can be useful in the event of legal complications.

For instance, if the Grantor’s address is “123 Cherry Lane, Lansing, Michigan”.

Step 7

Write the monetary amount the Grantee is providing for the property.

Specifying the monetary value the Grantee is providing for the property is essential to establish the consideration, a necessary component of a valid contract.

For instance, “$200,000”.

Step 8

Provide the full name of the person who is receiving or purchasing the property.

The full name of the person receiving or purchasing the property is needed to legally identify the new owner of the property.

Example: “Jane Smith”.

Step 9

Write the full address, including the county and state, of the Grantee.

Providing the full address of the Grantee verifies their residence and can also be helpful in the event of legal complications.

For instance, if the Grantee’s address is “456 Oak Street, Detroit, Michigan”.

Step 10

Provide a full legal description of the property being transferred.

This could include the address, lot number, or any other legal identifiers.

A full legal description of the property being transferred is crucial to unmistakably identify the property in question, avoiding any future disputes over the property’s identity.

For instance, “Lot 4 of the Cherry Lane Subdivision in Lansing, Michigan, according to the recorded plat thereof”.

Step 11

Each Grantor involved in the transaction should sign and print their name.

The signature and printed name of the Grantor(s) are necessary to validate the document, signifying that the Grantor acknowledges and consents to the transaction.

Step 12

Each Grantor should provide their full address, including city, state, and zip code.

Providing the Grantor’s address further verifies their identity and is a necessary part of the formal property transfer documents.

It should be the same as listed in Step 6.

Step 13 

This part is to be completed by a Notary Public.

It will include the date of signing and the Notary’s details.

The Grantor will sign in their presence.

The Notary will then seal or stamp the document, sign it, and specify the date their commission expires.

Remember, while this guide provides you with a step-by-step direction, it’s always important to get legal advice when dealing with property transactions to ensure that all aspects are correctly handled.

Conclusion

As you conclude this guide, keep in mind that accuracy and adherence to Michigan’s property laws are essential when dealing with special warranty deeds.

Consult legal professionals for guidance when necessary.