A special warranty deed in New Hampshire can be best understood as a hybrid of a quitclaim deed and a general warranty deed.

This deed offers a limited guarantee from the seller to the buyer, unlike the full guarantee provided in a general warranty deed.

Specifically, the seller assures that they have not transferred any interest in the property to someone else during their ownership.

Yet, they make no promises about any potential unrecorded transfers by previous owners.

Thus, a comprehensive title search is crucial to ascertain the exact interest being purchased in the property.

To fill out the New Hampshire Special (Limited) Warranty Deed, follow these steps:

Step 1

Enter the full legal name of the person preparing the deed.

The name of the person preparing the deed is crucial because it offers a point of contact should there be any future queries or issues concerning the document.

It ensures accountability in the preparation process.

Step 2

Write the complete address of the person who is preparing the deed.

It’s important to specify the complete address of the individual preparing the deed as it offers additional contact information, which could be vital in case of a legal dispute or for future reference.

Step 3

Enter the full legal name of the person or entity where the deed should be returned after recording.

This is important because after the deed has been recorded, it needs to be returned to a responsible party, generally the new owner or their legal representative, for safekeeping as it’s an important legal document providing proof of ownership.

Step 4

Write the complete address where the deed should be returned after recording. 

Similar to step 2, this information is vital for ensuring the deed is returned to the correct location following recording.

Step 5

Fill the blank with the full legal name of the current property owner (the Grantor).

These steps are critical as they identify the current owner (the Grantor) of the property. The Grantor is the one who has legal authority to transfer the property.

Step 6

Fill in the full address of the Grantor, including County and State.

These steps are critical as they identify the current owner (the Grantor) of the property. The Grantor is the one who has legal authority to transfer the property.

Step 7

Consideration After “in consideration of the sum of”, fill in the amount paid by the new owner (Grantee) in words, followed by the same amount in digits within the parenthesis.

Stating the consideration is a legal requirement for a deed.

It establishes that the Grantor has received something of value (usually money) in exchange for the property.

This is part of what makes the deed legally binding.

Step 8

After “does hereby grant, bargain, sell and convey unto”, enter the full legal name of the new owner (the Grantee).

These steps are vital as they identify the new owner (the Grantee) to whom the property rights are being transferred.

Step 9

Fill in the full address of the Grantee, including County and State.

These steps are vital as they identify the new owner (the Grantee) to whom the property rights are being transferred.

Step 10

Fill in the blank “situate in _________ County, State of New Hampshire, to wit:” with a complete legal description of the property being transferred.

This typically includes lot number, plat number, or any other identifiers, and should match the description in the public record.

A complete legal description of the property is necessary to uniquely identify the property being transferred. It allows anyone reading the deed to know precisely what property is being referred to, and it matches the description in the public records.

Step 11

Each Grantor should sign on the line labeled “Grantor’s Signature”.

The Grantor’s signature, printed name, and address are essential to authenticate the deed.

It’s the Grantor’s affirmation that they agree to the terms of the transfer and that they are transferring their rights to the property to the Grantee.

Step 12

Each Grantor should print their name on the line labeled “Grantor’s Name”.

The Grantor’s signature, printed name, and address are essential to authenticate the deed.

It’s the Grantor’s affirmation that they agree to the terms of the transfer and that they are transferring their rights to the property to the Grantee.

Step 13

Each Grantor should write their address, city, state, and zip code in the appropriate lines.

The Grantor’s signature, printed name, and address are essential to authenticate the deed.

It’s the Grantor’s affirmation that they agree to the terms of the transfer and that they are transferring their rights to the property to the Grantee.

Step 14

The Notary Public will complete this section in the presence of the Grantor(s). They will certify the identity of the Grantor, the date of acknowledgment, and sign on the “Notary Public” line.

The Notary will also fill in the date their commission expires.

Remember, it is important to have a qualified professional review the document to ensure its accuracy and legality. The above steps are a guide but do not replace professional legal advice.

Conclusion

With this guide, you’ve gained the knowledge needed to navigate the intricacies of New Hampshire Special Warranty Deeds.

Whether you’re a grantor or grantee, following these steps ensures that your real estate transactions proceed smoothly and in compliance with New Hampshire’s laws.